Mind Over Matter: How Virtual Reality Is Changing Healthcare

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“Just a few years ago, virtual reality headsets were futuristic, space-age stuff.

Now, this immersive technology has transcended video games and is being used to help people as they recover from injuries, surgeries, pain and disease, and mental health disorders.

The relative accessibility of virtual reality headsets like the Oculus Rift, which was released earlier this year, patients are now poised to receive interactive healthcare benefits.”

By Wendy Joan Biddlecombe at Hopefulheadlines.org

Read more: https://hopefulheadlines.org/2016/08/27/mind-over-matter-how-virtual-reality-is-changing-the-healthcare-game/

Stanford Experiments with Virtual Reality, Social-Emotional Learning and Oculus Rift

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“What can virtual reality, the technology that arguably takes the viewer farthest away from the tangible world, teach students about expressing themselves and interacting with each other?

Two experiments at two very different California schools [San Jose’s Alpha Public School and The Synapse School in Palo Alto] aimed to find out.

The members believe that “social and emotional learning (SEL) in its current state doesn’t engender real feelings in students because it isn’t immersive.

Often, SEL exercises involve students role-playing in pre-set scenarios that lack verisimilitude or immediacy.

It is difficult to imagine a teenager volunteering to participate in such a stilted interaction.

That’s where virtual reality and its accoutrement come in.”

By Blake Montgomery at EdSurge

Photo by Versatile

Read more: https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-08-16-stanford-experiments-with-virtual-reality-social-emotional-learning-and-oculus-rift

Overcoming Fears of Public Speaking with ‘Speech Center VR’ (incl. audio)

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“Cerevrum is building an ambitious educational platform starting with training people to become better public speakers with Speech Center.

The app is designed to help people get over their fears of public speaking, but there are many other educational learning opportunities from a number of upcoming courses featuring public speaking coaches.”

By Kent Bye at Voices of VR Podcast via Road to VR

Image: Cerevrum

Read more: http://www.roadtovr.com/overcoming-fears-public-speaking-speech-center-vr/

Teens with autism practice driving in virtual reality (video)

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“Researchers are designing a virtual reality simulator specifically for teaching teenagers with autism spectrum disorder to drive.

“In the past 15 years, there has been such an emphasis, such an appropriate emphasis, on early identification and early treatment of children with ASD,” says Amy Weitlauf, a psychologist who specializes in autism. “Well, now many of these children are adolescents and adults, so we have started to work on providing them with the support they need to become independent adults.

“And one of those key life skills for independence is, for many people, the ability to drive.”

By David Salisbury at VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY

Read more: http://www.futurity.org/virtual-reality-driving-autism-1211602-2/

Virtual reality transforms how medical students are taught

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“Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland has developed the world’s first fully interactive virtual reality medical training simulator, allowing users simulate emergency room management of a patient following a road traffic accident.

The RCSI VR Medical Training Sim app puts medical professionals and trainees in the shoes of the Emergency Department trauma team leader where they must assess the patient, make life or death decisions in real time and perform life-saving operative procedures as a surgeon would in a real emergency room.

RCSI has become the first higher education institution in the world to release a VR surgical training application on the publicly available platform, furthering its commitment to exploring new technologies to enhance education.

This new technology makes simulated training available in a mobile form, making it more accessible and affordable for trainees when access to high-end surgical simulators is not possible.”

Image and text by Newstalk

Read more: http://www.newstalk.com/reader/47.301.343/77987/0/

Infographic: Healthcare uses of VR

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“Virtual reality is a rapidly evolving market, which provides unlimited opportunities, and attracts a lot of newcomers. While the fastest growth in the industry is fed by the demand for video games and entertainment, the second biggest share belongs to healthcare applications.

Virtual and augmented technology has been already employed for diagnostics and treatment planning, training of future surgeons and dentists, treatment of severe conditions such as phobias, PTSD, autism, depression, addictions, and rehabilitation after life threatening diseases.”

Here are some recent use cases:

1. Live streaming surgeries
2. Surgery planning
3. Pain relief
4. Treating mental conditions

BY SCOTT KIM at Hypergridbusiness

Read more: http://www.hypergridbusiness.com/2016/07/infographic-healthcare-uses-of-vr/

Virtual reality for PTSD (incl. video)

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“Members of the military, first-responders and police officers may be more likely than most to struggle with PTSD. Now researchers are testing a new therapy designed to speed recovery.

JoAnn Difede, Ph.D., director of the Program for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian is developing a type of exposure therapy using virtual reality.

“The idea of the treatment is to teach the person, their brain, if you will, that those cues aren’t scary anymore. Nothing bad is going to happen,” explained Difede.”

By KSAT/Ivanhoe Newswire

Read more: http://www.ksat.com/health/virtual-reality-for-ptsd

How Virtual Reality Can Improve Patient Experience in Healthcare (Video)

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“In the past year, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center launched a pilot study with devices from Samsung that aimed at easing the stress of patients staying in the hospital.

The purpose of this pilot was to test virtual reality scenarios with Cedars-Sinai patients to determine if they enjoyed VR experiences while waiting for procedures or even throughout their hospital stay as an alternative for pain relief.

Researchers were interested in learning whether these experiences would reduce patients’ pain and anxiety or improve overall satisfaction with care.”

Post on Hitconsultant.net sponsored by Samsung.

Read more: http://hitconsultant.net/2016/06/30/virtual-reality-patient-experience/

Virtual Reality Aimed At The Elderly Finds New Fans

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“Virginia Anderlini (above) was the first private client to try out Dr. Sonya Kim’s new virtual reality program for the elderly, and says she’s eager to see more.

“There are over 100 clinical research papers that are already published that show proven positive clinical outcomes using VR in managing chronic pain, anxiety and depression,” Kim says. “And in dementia patients, all those three elements are very common.”

In addition to having private clients, Kim conducts group therapy sessions at Bay Area assisted-living centers, where a dozen or so people take turns with the goggles.”

Image and text by Kara Platoni at KQED Public Media

Read more: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/06/29/483790504/virtual-reality-aimed-at-the-elderly-finds-new-fans

Virtual Reality Shows Promise for Stroke Recovery (incl. video)

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“New therapeutic devices for stroke recovery, made possible by advances in hardware and software, are transforming the typically low-tech world of stroke rehabilitation.

Recovering from a stroke can be an arduous process. A device developed by researchers at NYU’s Rusk Rehabilitation is one of many new technologies that aim to keep patients engaged and motivated.

Though the tools are still in the early stages, doctors say that they can be more motivating and engaging for patients than current standard therapies, and that they hold promise for stroke survivors who are too injured for traditional therapy.”

Photo/Video: Denise Blostein at The Wall Street Journal

Read more: http://www.wsj.com/articles/high-tech-tools-show-promise-for-stroke-recovery-1466993040