Virtual Reality Helps Veterans with PTSD (incl. video)

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“Veterans and active duty military members are using virtual reality to relive the worst moments of their life in an innovative counseling program being offered for free at the University of Central Florida’s PTSD Clinic.

“It’s a very intense program but the advantage is that we can really take care of this disorder and treat this disorder thoroughly and effectively in a short period of time,” said Dr. Deborah Beidel, the founder of UCF Restores, a program that uses a combination of counseling and exposure therapy to treat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Iraq War veteran Bruce Chambers was one of the first patients to go through the therapy.”

By Dana Jay at WOFL FOX 35

Read more: http://www.fox35orlando.com/news/local-news/217037965-story

Don’t like spiders or snakes? Clinic says virtual reality can defeat real fears (incl. video)

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“Scenarios involving spiders – so many spiders, crawling all over you – heights, public transport and crowds are being tested or are already available to download and use … at Australia’s first specialist, virtual-reality phobia treatment clinic, which recently opened in Sydney.

Meanwhile a large number of research groups are investigating potential uses for the new technology.

A London-based project for example is exploring using train-station simulations to treat social anxiety. The simulated patrons can even be programmed to turn and stare at the user – helpful for treating paranoia.”

By Liam Mannix at The Sydney Morning Herald

Image: Ignis VR

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/technology/technology-news/clinic-makes-real-life-less-scary-by-letting-you-face-fears-in-virtual-reality-20161107-gsjrj3.html

Can Virtual Reality Unlock The Cure To PTSD? (inc. video)

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“At USC’s Institute for Creative Technologies Albert “Skip” Rizzo and his team are using virtual reality — a technology in the midst of booming growth — to help combat veterans fully process and recover from PTSD.

In Rizzo’s “Bravemind” program, patients revisit painful memories in a VR setting, under the care of a trained therapist. This sense memory allows them to access the memory clearly and, in doing so, to fully process it.

It’s a revolutionary type of exposure therapy that has so far netted promising results.”

BY STEVE BRAMUCCI at Uproxx.com

Read more: http://uproxx.com/life/bravemind-virtual-reality/

Mind Over Matter: How Virtual Reality Is Changing Healthcare

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“Just a few years ago, virtual reality headsets were futuristic, space-age stuff.

Now, this immersive technology has transcended video games and is being used to help people as they recover from injuries, surgeries, pain and disease, and mental health disorders.

The relative accessibility of virtual reality headsets like the Oculus Rift, which was released earlier this year, patients are now poised to receive interactive healthcare benefits.”

By Wendy Joan Biddlecombe at Hopefulheadlines.org

Read more: https://hopefulheadlines.org/2016/08/27/mind-over-matter-how-virtual-reality-is-changing-the-healthcare-game/

Stanford Experiments with Virtual Reality, Social-Emotional Learning and Oculus Rift

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“What can virtual reality, the technology that arguably takes the viewer farthest away from the tangible world, teach students about expressing themselves and interacting with each other?

Two experiments at two very different California schools [San Jose’s Alpha Public School and The Synapse School in Palo Alto] aimed to find out.

The members believe that “social and emotional learning (SEL) in its current state doesn’t engender real feelings in students because it isn’t immersive.

Often, SEL exercises involve students role-playing in pre-set scenarios that lack verisimilitude or immediacy.

It is difficult to imagine a teenager volunteering to participate in such a stilted interaction.

That’s where virtual reality and its accoutrement come in.”

By Blake Montgomery at EdSurge

Photo by Versatile

Read more: https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-08-16-stanford-experiments-with-virtual-reality-social-emotional-learning-and-oculus-rift

Overcoming Fears of Public Speaking with ‘Speech Center VR’ (incl. audio)

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“Cerevrum is building an ambitious educational platform starting with training people to become better public speakers with Speech Center.

The app is designed to help people get over their fears of public speaking, but there are many other educational learning opportunities from a number of upcoming courses featuring public speaking coaches.”

By Kent Bye at Voices of VR Podcast via Road to VR

Image: Cerevrum

Read more: http://www.roadtovr.com/overcoming-fears-public-speaking-speech-center-vr/

Teens with autism practice driving in virtual reality (video)

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“Researchers are designing a virtual reality simulator specifically for teaching teenagers with autism spectrum disorder to drive.

“In the past 15 years, there has been such an emphasis, such an appropriate emphasis, on early identification and early treatment of children with ASD,” says Amy Weitlauf, a psychologist who specializes in autism. “Well, now many of these children are adolescents and adults, so we have started to work on providing them with the support they need to become independent adults.

“And one of those key life skills for independence is, for many people, the ability to drive.”

By David Salisbury at VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY

Read more: http://www.futurity.org/virtual-reality-driving-autism-1211602-2/

Virtual reality transforms how medical students are taught

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“Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland has developed the world’s first fully interactive virtual reality medical training simulator, allowing users simulate emergency room management of a patient following a road traffic accident.

The RCSI VR Medical Training Sim app puts medical professionals and trainees in the shoes of the Emergency Department trauma team leader where they must assess the patient, make life or death decisions in real time and perform life-saving operative procedures as a surgeon would in a real emergency room.

RCSI has become the first higher education institution in the world to release a VR surgical training application on the publicly available platform, furthering its commitment to exploring new technologies to enhance education.

This new technology makes simulated training available in a mobile form, making it more accessible and affordable for trainees when access to high-end surgical simulators is not possible.”

Image and text by Newstalk

Read more: http://www.newstalk.com/reader/47.301.343/77987/0/

Infographic: Healthcare uses of VR

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“Virtual reality is a rapidly evolving market, which provides unlimited opportunities, and attracts a lot of newcomers. While the fastest growth in the industry is fed by the demand for video games and entertainment, the second biggest share belongs to healthcare applications.

Virtual and augmented technology has been already employed for diagnostics and treatment planning, training of future surgeons and dentists, treatment of severe conditions such as phobias, PTSD, autism, depression, addictions, and rehabilitation after life threatening diseases.”

Here are some recent use cases:

1. Live streaming surgeries
2. Surgery planning
3. Pain relief
4. Treating mental conditions

BY SCOTT KIM at Hypergridbusiness

Read more: http://www.hypergridbusiness.com/2016/07/infographic-healthcare-uses-of-vr/

Virtual reality for PTSD (incl. video)

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“Members of the military, first-responders and police officers may be more likely than most to struggle with PTSD. Now researchers are testing a new therapy designed to speed recovery.

JoAnn Difede, Ph.D., director of the Program for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian is developing a type of exposure therapy using virtual reality.

“The idea of the treatment is to teach the person, their brain, if you will, that those cues aren’t scary anymore. Nothing bad is going to happen,” explained Difede.”

By KSAT/Ivanhoe Newswire

Read more: http://www.ksat.com/health/virtual-reality-for-ptsd